Friday, September 16, 2011

Online Habits

7:29 sunrise
20:22 sunset


This really great article kinda sums up how I feel about my online life.  It's a good read - really worth the time, in my opinion.  Very little of what it says is new (the idea that on the interwebs we are always mere seconds away from gratification and that our patience is being eroded in real life situations) but I really like how it is said.  I also appreciate that the article doesn't entirely dismiss "digital life."  After all, I certainly find plenty of entertainment in my blogging, facebooking, tweeting and flickering.  It's just that I hate feeling like I sometimes have too much of an online life.  That I can't tear myself away from it.  And this is coming from a person who spends a lot of time outside and who doesn't have a cellphone/mobile device of any sort.  I am more than capable of turning my online world off when I go on vacation, for example.  As the author says, "An inability to log off is hardly the most destructive habit you could acquire, but it seems unlikely there is any more widespread compulsion among the professional middle-class and their children than lingering online."


UGH.


Anyhow, the whole article is good, but I also chuckled at this section, Lee Siegel's statement about online habits and bloggers:
1. Not everyone has something valuable to say.
2. Few people have anything original to say.
3. Only a handful of people know how to write well.
4. Most people will do almost anything to be liked.
5. “Customers” are always right, but “people” aren’t.
Bloggers on the whole write carelessly, their ideas are commonplace, they curry favor with readers and one another, and their popularity is no index of their worthiness. Siegel quotes Spinoza: “All things excellent are both difficult and rare.”


So thanks for reading, peeps :)  Have a great weekend.

3 comments:

Tony said...

I wanted to read it but my online attention span couldn't handle it. Seriously.

Jennoit said...

Touché.

madam0wl, a.k.a Sandra said...

I find it sad that I'm proud of myself for reading the whole thing. Like the article says, after years now of internet addiction, it is getting hard for me to digest pithy text which isn't broken up by pretty pictures or bold test sub headings, etc. About half way through I was getting flashbacks of dragging myself through assigned readings in grad school, i.e. it was a bit hard to swallow. But I think that is because it got my brain churning and I had to reread a few parts to see if I understood it completely. Found a couple typos too. Thanks for sharing it!

PS at the end I noticed it had a Google+ share option so I did that and then found you over there and added you to my Circles there. Oh, the neverending 6 degrees of internet separation...